More White-eyes

24 November 2014

A bit of a disaster on the white-eye front today: one stunned itself on the window and, quick as a flash, Moustache had it. One white-eye down. :(

But continuing a theme (because I have been at my desk a lot studying for a route check), some more images of the ones that are still alive…

Eyes Left! (…and centre, and right)

22 November 2014

One more of my little study distractions.

One little wax eye keeping his eye out (probably for Moustache...)

One little wax eye keeping his eye out (probably for Moustache…)

Silvereye in the Feijoas

21 November 2014

Right outside my office window at home is a feijoa tree (which we mistook for a pohutukawa when we moved in years ago… until we noticed feijoas on the ground underneath it), and the little wax eyes (or silvereyes, whatever you prefer) love the flowers. There is a small group that mob it each afternoon, including some fledglings constantly calling for food from their parents. While I missed any reasonable shots of the feeding process because I’m just too slow, I did manage to get this guy. Finally.

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Wax-eye, white-eye, silvereye, tauhou or Zosterops lateralis lateralis — call it what you will, it’s a sweet wee birdie that is very quick and difficult to catch with a camera.

 

Prickly Digital Art

17 November 2014

A bit of ‘digital art’, subject thanks to the succulent garden in the Sydney Botanic Gardens.

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Honey Bee

5 November 2014

Back to work tomorrow :( so out with the camera today–just a brief foray into the garden, where I found this chap.

In my garden, a honey bee sits on a leaf which sits on a lichen-covered rock.

In my garden, a honey bee sits on a leaf which sits on a lichen-covered rock.

Two More Kotuku

31 October 2014

Just a couple more images from the Waitangiroto trip. On a bit of a black-and-white thing at the moment…

Welcome home ritual between nested pair.

Welcome home ritual between nested pair.

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Take-off and landing is precarious for large birds on spindly foliage.

Nature Photographer’s Paradise

27 October 2014

Last week’s journey led me to a very special part of New Zealand, the Waitangiroto Nature Reserve, to view its very special inhabitants.

The reserve lies on the Waitangitoana River 14 km north-west of Whataroa in South Westland, about a half-hour drive from Franz Josef. The coastal swampland remains covered in its original vegetation—a thick forest blanket of mature kahikatea. This pristine habitat houses New Zealand’s only kotuku (Egretta alba modesta) breeding site (discovered in 1865 by surveyor Gerhard Mueller), and one of only four known breeding sites for the royal spoonbill (Platalea regia). During the breeding season (September to February) around 40 pairs of kotuku and 16 pairs of spoonbill make camp, harmoniously side by side, within the reserve. The total New Zealand population of kotuku numbers fewer than 200; and royal spoonbills number around 130. The only way you can get to see these birds is to go with  White Heron Sanctuary Tours.

(Most of that paragraph is from an article I’m attempting to get published. A very long shot, so you’ll probably see the rest of it here in due course!)

And here’s some of what I saw!

 

 

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